Tashi Lhamo, a 14-year-old eighth-grader, loves the Engl

lish class, which is taught by a Jiangsu teacher who is humorous and friendly. Memorizin

g vocabulary can be a dull task, so the teacher brings snacks, desserts or small gifts as incentives.

To spice up the classes, the teacher finds ancient Chinese poems that

have been translated into English and lets the students work out the original versions.

“My teachers in primary school didn’t use lots of multimedia. They were all too serious, so

the students rarely interacted or joked with them. But the Jiangsu teachers know how to use multimedia, and

always tell us things outside of our textbooks. The class is always great fun,” Tashi Lhamo said.

Chemi Drolma, an 18-year-old senior, plans to apply for a “normal” university-one that te

aches a range of subjects-after taking the gaokao, the national college entrance exam, in June.

Her favorite subject is geography, because it is the most ac

tive class. The school has a special geography classroom, and the teacher often uses a proje

ctor to display maps and images of different terrains to help the children better understand the lesson.

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